Planning Your Stay Near Delaware Bay

Dela-where? The Small Wonder. This little state has substantial historical significance being the first state to ratify the constitution of the United States in 1787. And where else can you find an Apple Scrapple Festival and a Punkin Chunkin contest?

Delaware is the Diamond State, as coined by Thomas Jefferson, because of its ideal location. At only 100 miles long and 35 miles wide, Delaware maintains a perfect location along the East Coast seaboard. In addition, the Delaware Bay is an important link in the Atlantic Intercoastal Waterway, connecting Philadelphia to the Atlantic Ocean through the Delaware River.

 

The Delaware Bay

Delaware Bay forms an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean along the east coast and borders Delaware and New Jersey. This estuary creates a habitat for 130 species of finfish and is optimal for clams, oysters, and crabs. It is also home to the world’s largest horseshoe crab population.

A wood map accentuates the depths of the bay and highlights the shallows, creating a unique perspective of the waterways and cays that invite wildlife, flora, and fauna. The deepest waters can support larger mammals, including humpback whales and great white sharks, while the shoreline ecosystem supports diamondback terrapin, ducks, and dolphins.

As beautiful as the Delaware Bay may appear, it is also one of the richest habitats along the East Coast. Lined with beaches, marshes, and mudflats, the bay is extraordinarily rich in food and resources. Many of the rivers feeding Delaware Bay hold a protected status for their salt marsh wetlands bordering the bay as they serve as a breeding ground for many species.

The bordering bay of Delaware plays an instrumental role in commerce as one of the most important navigational channels in the United States. Its lower course forms one of the East Coast’s primary channels, the Intercoastal Waterway. This formidable body of water provides a significant contribution to the surrounding area, but you cannot box this waterway in as all work and no play.

The Delaware Bay is an East Coast treasure, providing off-the-beaten-path adventures and hidden gems at every turn. Whether you want to explore the outdoors, admire historic lighthouses, or dig your toes into the sand at the shoreline, Delaware Bay does not disappoint. Come discover why Delaware’s son, President Joe Biden, has repeatedly said, “When I die, Delaware will be written on my heart.”

 

What to do Near Delaware Bay

Check your Delaware Bay wood map, and you will find the fun starts just east of Dover, following the Delaware Bayshore Byway (Route 9). Quaint towns and quiet coastlines beg to be explored and enjoyed.

Put city life behind you and spend your day scouring the sand for seashells, colorful rocks, and sea glass. This winding road will take you through four perfectly picturesque beach destinations.

 

The Delaware Bayshore Byway Four

  • Woodland Beach
  • Port Mahon
  • Pickering Beach
  • Kitts Hummock Beach

 

These East Coast beaches are bathed in sun, fun, and blissfully crowd-free. In addition to fun finds like sea glass and seashells, Woodland Beach features the perfect pier for dropping a line and watching a bobber rest on the waterline. It is a prime opportunity to fish for common fish, including:

 

 Fish Found in Delaware Bay

  • striped bass
  • perch
  • flounder
  • catfish
  • croakers

 

Up the East Coast and especially into Delaware Bay, seafood is a sacred delicacy. Crab cakes, crab legs, and pretty much anything blue crab-related is a specialty of DELMARVA. Check your wood map to locate the shallow, warmer waters of the tidal creeks around the Delaware Bay. Then, spend your summer crabbing at Holt’s Landing State Park – it’s the best public crabbing pier in Delaware.

 

Where to Eat Near the Delaware Bay

Miles of white sand keep visitors flocking to the beaches of Delaware Bay. Lewes Beach is a particular favorite due to its location behind a “breakwater.” Its protected position keeps its shallow waters calm and friendly for family vacations.

The East Coast town of Lewes, where the Delaware Bay and the Atlantic Ocean meet, is a classic beach town, offering eateries for families and fine dining for date night in the same sun-soaked space. From seafood to comfort food and pizza to sushi, finding an excellent meal in Lewes is only a stroll away from your blanket on the beach.

 

Spectacular Spots to Eat Near Delaware Bay

 

The Delaware Bay is famous up and down the East Coast for its two kinds of oysters. First, look at a wood map to find the Cape Shore. There you can harvest Cape Shore oysters which are a little briny with a sweet, nutty astringency. The same wood map will detail the inner shore where you can harvest oysters that are a little milder in flavor.

 

One Bay, Two States

One benefit of the Delaware Bay is that it borders two different states – Delaware and New Jersey – and both can be enjoyed thoroughly without going far from the East Coast estuary. New Jersey connects to Delaware by the Cape May – Lewes Ferry. Passengers and cars travel across the bay and continue their enjoyment of the shoreline from state to state.

The Jersey Cape is famous for its beaches and piers. The beaches on the bay offer protection from rough waters and attract wanderers and explorers, meandering through the dunes throughout the day. In addition, the Historic Cold Spring Village and many local museums keep generations of families coming back to the Jersey Cape.

Sunrise or sunset, Delaware Bay offers spectacular views and so many reasons to return year after year.

The Delaware Bay area will leave a lasting impression on you. Its friendly people, historic sites, and breathtaking landscapes will be a pleasant surprise not soon forgotten.

With the help of a high-quality wood map, you will travel the roads, feel the salt spray, and grow warm from pride in our First State. A Delaware Bay wood map will help you commemorate your journey into America’s Diamond State and create pride in your home décor that links you to our great nation’s beginning.


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