Why You Need to Visit Lake Livingston This Summer

Looking for a solid vacation destination this summer? Lake Livingston, the largest reservoir in Texas, should top your list. Covering 83,000 acres, this Water Wonderland is the second largest lake in Texas and offers over 450 miles of fun-filled shoreline. A wood map of Lake Livingston will reveal the mysteries of the depths and splendor of the shallows that can be enjoyed during your sun-soaked visit.

With an average depth of twenty-three feet, Lake Livingston creates a recreational hot spot for locals and visitors alike. The lake was created by the installation of the Livingston Dam in 1971. Before the dam, the water flowed freely as the Trinity River and was a commerce superhighway.

Dock with walkout leading to Lake Livingston

The Trinity River was a main thoroughfare for boats seeking ports to sell their goods in the 1800s. The town of Swartwout was established where the Livingston Dam is now erected and had to re-established elsewhere, leaving a ghost town in the depths of the water closest to the dam.

Lake Livingston is large enough to have an island. Pine Island is at the southern end of the reservoir and has ten- to thirty-foot bluffs on all sides. There is one road through the small island but no services or amenities. It is most popular for boaters to anchor up near its sandy beaches and enjoy the shallow waters.

Along the banks outlined on a map of Lake Livingston, you will find an amazing array of recreational amenities. So, pack up the family and head to the great state of Texas. It may seem like a whole other country, but you will find all the comforts of home and the adventure of a lifetime!

Set Up Camp and Make Yourself at Home

There is no lack of space for those who want to call Lake Livingston home for a short time. With 5,000 campsites and 100 boat ramps, there is room for everyone to enjoy the space nature has to offer. In addition, several parks offer amenities and services that rival the comforts of home.

These Parks Will Not Disappoint

  • Lake Livingston State Park
  • Wolf Creek Park
  • Tigerville Park

Lake Livingston State Park lies about an hour outside of Houston and offers some of the best fishing in Texas. With tent sites, full hook-up sites, and ten screened shelters, you will be pleased with the options available for your vacation. In addition, there is a store on-site for supplies, and the park offers a variety of free ranger programs so you can learn the camping basics from a pro!

Trees and trails in WoodCreek State Park

Wolf Creek Park is part of the Trinity River Authority. Starting at the park marina, you will find everything you need to stay comfortable, entertained, and well-fed during your time at the park. Wolf Creek Park is located near the hospitable small town of Coldspring, where you can enjoy country cooking and authentic arts and crafts. 

Tigerville Park offers public boat ramps, restrooms, and plenty of parking. These free amenities are available to visitors who enjoy the campsites of Lake Livingston State Park or any of the area resorts. A stress-free and convenient way to get your boat in the water, Tigerville Park is an invaluable asset to the Livingston area.

Cast a Line and Enjoy the Best Fishing in Texas

Lake Livingston is known for some of the best fishing in Texas. Stocked with Florida bass and striped bass, the lake is an angler’s paradise! In addition, Lake Livingston is a notable white bass fishery.  A wood map of Lake Livingston details the excellent water conditions that allow the species to be plentiful and grow to large sizes.

Man standing next to son that's holding fish in hands

Also notable is the blue catfish, which dominates the catfish fishery. These fish are easily caught year-round with live bait on the main river channel and off the river in channels and tributaries.  

Other Popular Fish Species in the Lake

  • largemouth bass
  • striped bass
  • crappie 

Bring your own tackle or rent it at the campground. Either way, you will have plenty of fish tales to share when you return home. 

Lake Livingston Water Activities

In addition to camping and fishing, the state parks have equipment available to rent for a variety of water sports and activities. The lake is plenty big enough to avoid over-crowding, so plan to use the equipment for several days! Also, with waterfront access from your campsite, enjoying your days on the water will be stress-free.

Additional Water Activities

  • Boating – rent a boat or bring your own, there is plenty of room on the lake
  • Sailing-enjoy the expanse of water and anchor at Pine Island
  • Jet skiing or water skiing-there is enough space to catch a wake or two
Two girls standing on boats holding hands with them in air

Want to take a break from the water for the afternoon? Check out Livingston Main Street. Local lake art, restaurants, boutiques, and other unique finds await as you adventure through the heart of the town.

As a bonus – Livingston is on the Monarch Butterfly Migration trail. Every fall and spring, the beautiful butterflies can be seen making their way to and from Mexico. Create beautiful memories with photographs of these stunning beauties. A framed butterfly photo will hang great on a gallery wall next to your favorite lake art or a wood map of Lake Livingston.

Points of Interest on a Map of Lake Livingston

Lake Livingston, Texas 3-D Nautical Wood Chart, Medium, 13.5" x 31"

Lake Livingston is a reservoir created to provide surplus water to the people and area of Houston. However, by installing a dam in the Trinity River, the shoreline changed, and towns initially established as ports along the commerce superhighway had to relocate. The town of Swartwout is one such example.

Follow the shoreline on a high-quality wood map of Lake Livingston, and you will find several points of interest. The area is rich in history, and stories are plentiful. There are three specific points of interest to consider on a wood map.

Three Points of Interest on Lake Livingston

  1. Onalaska
  2. West Tempe
  3. White Rock Creek

1. Onalaska Was a Boom Town In the 1900s

Onalaska rose to instant boom town fame in the 1900s with the largest sawmill in Texas. At one point, the town of Onalaska was larger than the then-county seat, Livingston. The town enjoyed several decades of success, but eventually, the sawmill closed due to the depletion of timber in the area.

2. West Tempe is Easy to Miss but Hard to Forget

West Tempe is located off Highway 190 between Onalaska and Livingston, just off the shore of Lake Livingston. The tiny town in Polk County blends into suburbs with colorful names such as Tobacco Patch, Tigerville, and Bold Springs. In the details of a wood map of Lake Livingston, you may recognize that the now-submerged town of Swartwout is nearby.

3. White Rock Creek Feeds Lake Livingston

Creek with bridge going over and trees on both sides

The creek starts north of Dallas and flows south, crossing through populous areas of the state yet remaining largely undisturbed and heavily wooded. Many state parks are within its watershed, which extends up to two-and-a-half miles on either side of its path. The creek ultimately feeds into the Trinity River at Lake Livingston.

Lake Livingston provides a stunning backdrop for anyone looking to embrace nature on vacation. A wood map becomes spectacular lake art, revealing the many creeks and tributaries that contribute to the reservoir and beg to be explored. With the plethora of area resources, even a novice outdoors person would enjoy a successful stay at one of the many waterfront campsites.

They say everything is bigger in Texas, and you will prove that when you capture all the memories! With stunning lake art, creative and decorative wood maps of Lake Livingston, as well as your personal photographs, your time near this Texas treasure will be top of mind after you return home.

Explore the depths and shallows of the reservoir with your high-quality wood map of Lake Livingston every day.  Your vacation lake art will memorialize your experience and bring a smile back to your face remembering that perfect summer by the shore.


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